KM3NeT - Recent News

Latest news items.

KM3NeT Town Hall meeting

17-19 December 2019, KM3NeT Town Hall meeting in Marseille to promote our amazing multi-messenger programmes.

Website with programme.

 

 

 

 

Stay tuned!

First keynote speakers

After the general introduction by the KM3NeT Spokesperson Mauro Taiuti, the Deputy Spokesperson Aart Heijboer will present the expected performances of KM3NeT detectors and Dorothea Samtleben will show the first data from KM3NeT.

 

 


We need you!

KM3NeT is searching for the best drawings of a neutrino!

Have you ever pictured a neutrino in your mind?

Do you have any idea how it might look like?

Share your idea with us latest 15 March 2019.

Curious? You find more information on the website of Draw me a neutrino


First KM3NeT group in China

08 November 2019 – We are happy to welcome the Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU), China, in our collaboration!

The HEP group at the School of Physics in SYSU is involved in various aspects of the intensity frontier, cosmic frontier and energy frontier, being involved in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment, the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory, and the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory experiment among others.
The high-energy astrophysics group at the School of Physics and Astronomy focuses on theoretical study and data analysis of extreme high-energy phenomena, such as GRB, SNR and AGN. Together with the Tianqin Research Center at SPA, which is devoted to Tianqin project – a LISA-like space gravitational wave project, the group is focusing on the multi-messenger study, combining information from various messengers from space, such as electromagnetic radiation, neutrinos and gravitational waves.

“In short, the team at SYSU has a broad endeavor in neutrino physics and multi-messenger studies. With the help of KM3NeT, we will be able to further reach the neutrino spectrum in the cosmic frontier, crossing-over with other interesting sciences.” says Lily Yang, PI of the new KM3NeT group.


Data taking with KM3NeT

19 August 2019 – Since this spring, the KM3NeT telescopes are routinely operating with five detection units: four at the ORCA site, one at the ARCA site. First data results have been reported on the international conferences and workshops.

For the ORCA detector, off shore the French Provencal coast, four units were installed and connected to the seabed network. An earlier deployed unit was damaged during inspection and had to be recovered for repair in the labs of the Collaboration. It will be re-deployed in a next sea campaign. Also during the Spring-campaigns, three autonomous acoustic beacons were deployed at the seabed in the vicinity of the ORCA array. They are used for acoustic positioning of the optical modules in the detection units that move with the slowly varying deep sea currents. Sea campaigns for further expansion of the ORCA detector are scheduled after the summer break.

Offshore Sicily at the site of ARCA, after a fix of the seabed network, a detection unit that was deployed three years ago, could be revived and is again taking data since. Currently, the seabed network is being re-designed to allow for the extension of the ARCA detector to more than 200 detector units. The successful though temporary fix of the existing network makes connection of more detection units possible, while waiting for the implementation of the upgraded network.

 

Differences between ARCA and ORCA

The technology used for the ARCA and ORCA detectors is  almost identical, but the difference in volume and height of the detectors and the density of optical modules in the detectors are strikingly different.  When finished, the volume of ARCA  will be more than 100 times larger then that of ORCA. ARCA will have a volume of about 1 Gton and ORCA ‘only’ about 8 Mton, while the number of optical modules in ARCA will only be twice that of ORCA: about 4000 vs about 2000. Consequently,  module density in ORCA will be about five times larger than that in ARCA. How is that achieved? In both detectors, eighteen optical modules are attached to each vertical detection unit. In ARCA, the distance between the lowest and the highest module is about 600. In ORCA this is about 150 m. Also the horizontal spacing between detection units is different: about 90 m in ARCA vs about 20 m in ORCA. Although, ARCA will have only twice the number of detection units, its foot print on the sea bed is much larger  that that of ORCA.

The geometrical differences reflect the main scientific purpose for which the detectors will be used. These are also visible in the first character of their names: ARCA stands for ‘Astroparticle Research with Cosmics in the Abyss’. The sparsely instrumented detector is optimised for the detection of high-energy cosmic neutrinos from distant sources in the Universe. ORCA is the acronym for ‘Oscillation Research with Cosmics in the Abyss’. The more densily instrumented detector is optimised to measure lower energy neutrinos,  thus providing data for the study of neutrinos oscillating between the three known neutrino flavours. The words ‘in the Abyss’ refer to the locations of the detectors several kilometres deep in the Mediterranean Sea.

 

KM3NeT-ARCA and ORCA
KM3NeT: Comparison of the physical size of the ARCA and ORCA detectors.

 


KM3NeT at #icrc2019

 

28 July 2019 – The bi-annual International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC) is one of the most important conferences  where astroparticle physicists share their latest results. This year’s conference, the 36th edition,  is organised in Madison, Wisconsin, USA, from 24 July – 1 August.

Together, the ANTARES and KM3NeT Collaborations present their results in a highlight talk by Rosa Coniglione and in total 35 talks and posters.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


For the experts:

Below a gallery of  contributions  presented  at #icrc2019 on be half of the KM3NeT Collaboration. They comprise technical work, calibration work, data analysis, software developments and predictions of  sensitivities of the detectors and theoretical limits. Click on the images for the proceedings.

Talks:

Posters: