KM3NeT - News Archive

Archive of news items

KM3NeT congratulates IceCube!

KM3NeT congratulates the researchers of the IceCube Collaboration for their compelling evidence for high-energy neutrinos originating from blazar TXS 0506+056.

On 22 September 2017, the IceCube neutrino telescope detected a high-energy neutrino of about 290 TeV passing through the deep South Pole ice. When a series of gamma-ray telescopes looked at the same location in the sky they identified a blazar, TXS 0506+056, which happened to be flaring at that moment. In addition, IceCube found an excess of high-energy neutrino events with respect to atmospheric backgrounds at that location between September 2014 and March 2015. Details of the IceCube results can be found at their website.

The ANTARES neutrino telescope in the deep Mediterranean Sea followed up the initial IceCube real-time alert, but no time coincident events were found. However, a time integrated search during the period 2007-2017, did yield a small excess of neutrinos in that direction. Have a look at their website for details.

The first identification of an astrophysical source of high-energy neutrinos represents an important step forward for the fledgling field of multi-messenger astronomy. With its unprecedented angular resolution and complementary field of view, KM3NeT looks forward to soon joining IceCube and ANTARES in the hunt for the enigmatic sources of cosmic neutrinos. Exciting times are ahead of us!

 

Image: A blazar emitting neutrinos and gamma rays, Credit: IceCube/NASA

In this artistic rendering, a blazar is accelerating protons that produce pions, which produce neutrinos and gamma rays. Neutrinos are always the result of a hadronic reaction such as the one displayed here. Gamma rays can be produced in both hadronic and electromagnetic interactions.


Characterisation of photomultipliers for KM3NeT

31 May 2018 – Each KM3NeT optical sensor module contains 31 photomultiplier tubes. Each KM3NeT detection unit comprises 18 optical modules, i.e. a total of 18 x 31 = 558 photomultipliers. Together the ARCA and ORCA detectors of KM3NeT will comprise a total of 345 detection units, i.e. 345 x 558 =192,510 photomultipliers. So, you can imagine that it is important to very well understand the characteristics of these photomultipliers. Read more


Subatech for KM3NeT


Australia joins KM3NeT

KM3NeT is very happy to welcome to the Collaboration it’s newest institute and a new continent, the Western Sydney University, Australia. Led by Professor Miroslav Filipovic, director of the UWS Penrith Observatory, the group has considerable expertise in gamma and radio astronomy.


 


Convention about DOM production line in Morocco

On 7 February 2018, during the KM3NeT Collaboration meeting in Rabat, a convention was signed between the Ministère de l’Enseignement Supérieure et de la Recherche Scientific du Maroc, l’Université Mohammed V de Rabat, l’Université Mohamed premier d’Oujda, l’Université Cadi Ayyed de Marrakech and the KM3NeT Collaboration for the setup of a production line of optical modules for the construction of the KM3NeT telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea.

With the implementation of the production line the Morrocan groups in KM3NeT significantly contribute to the construction of KM3NeT.

  


Measuring waves in the deep-sea

22 November 2017  – Geophysicists of  NIOZ Royal Netherlands institute for sea research and members of the KM3NeT Collaboration, have successfully anchored a unique 3D array with 550 high-resolution temperature sensors at the KM3NeT-Fr site, about 40 km offshore Toulon.  The device was anchored using the Ifremer/Genavir ship l’Atalante.

The temperature sensors are mounted on a structure of five parallel lines with a height of 100 m, 4 m apart. It is transported in a folded form and the arms of the structure and the folded lines with temperature sensors are unfolded overboard prior to deployment.

With  this device geophysicists in KM3NeT will study the motion of the Mediterranean Sea at a depth of about 2500 m. The deep sea is constantly in motion and waves develop supported by stable water layers. These internal waves in the deep sea are much slower than the waves at the surface, but are much higher: 10 m up to more than 100 m.  With the NIOZ device the turbulence and wave breaking in the deep sea can be measured with high precision.

  

 

 

 

 

 

See for an earlier deployment of the 3D sensor device the video below. First it shows the deployment of the top of the line with a.o. orange buoys. This is followed by a fascinating interplay of people pulling strings at the right time to unfold the structure. Once the structure is unfolded it is connected to the top  of the string before descending to the seabed.

 


Watch the KM3NeT Experience VR

20171102 – Watch the KM3NeT Experience

Watch this trailer using a google cardboard or any VR glasses. This is the trailer of the KM3NeT virtual reality Experience by Carlos Maximiliano Mollo researcher at the “Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare” (INFN). KM3NeT Experience is not only a virtual reality adventure but also an interactive electroacoustic music composition. Sounds and music were made by Alba Francesca Battista.

 

 

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Best poster at CNNP 2017

26 October 2017 – The KM3NeT Collaboration congratulates Giovanna Ferrara of INFN/LNS and the University of Catania, Italy with the award of the best poster presented at the Conference for Neutrino and Nuclear Physics, CNNP2017, in Catania, Italy.

With the poster ‘First results of the KM3NeT/ARCA detector‘, she presents the preliminary results of detailed studies comparing Monte Carlo predictions and the measurements collected in about a year of data taking with two ARCA detection units. In particular, she shows that the measured dependency of the flux of down going muon particles with the depth in the sea is in agreement with prediction. The results confirm that the ARCA detection units are well calibrated.

Giovanna presented the poster on behalf of the KM3NeT Collaboration. Co-author was Simone Biagi, INFN/LNS, Catania, Italy

The awarded poster.
The award ceremony. Giovanna Ferrara second from the right.

 


KM3NeT meets in Marseille

This week,  2-6 October 2017, researchers and engineers of  ANTARES and KM3NeT met in Marseille, France for their yearly Fall meeting. The Collaboration meeting was organised by the colleagues of the ANTARES/KM3NeT team of the CPPM research institute for particle and nuclear physics. A week full of science and technology reports and discussions including the  presentation of the first data of the recently deployed first detection unit of the ORCA detector offshore the coast of Toulon, France.

Colleagues of the IceCube Collaboration and from the GVD Lake Baikal Collaboration will join during the weekend for the yearly MANTS meeting of the GNN Global Neutrino Network.